Mortgage Broker in Johns Island, SC

We know that many home loan officers have horrible reputations. Some brokers only see their clients as transactions, and a means to make quick money. They come off as impatient and pushy, failing to understand that this is a very big decision for you. At Mission One Mortgage, we take the opposite approach. We encourage our clients to take as much time as needed to ask us questions and review mortgage documents. We could say that our mission is to exceed your expectations, but we'd rather just show you. From assistance finding FHA, VA, or other loans to refinancing your current mortgage, Mission One is the team you can trust.

Here are just a few reasons why home buyers choose Mission One Mortgage:

No Additional Fees

No Additional Fees- Providing our client's services free of charge, using a mortgage broker like Mission One Mortgage can help you scout the best price on loans without a hefty price tag.

Access to 50 Lenders

Access to 50 Lenders- With access to a range of loans and interest rates available, Mission One Mortgage can shop for the best loans for your unique needs.

Accessible to Our Clients

Accessible to Our Clients- Providing a transparent and communicative service to all our clients, Mission One Mortgage ensures all phone calls are answered or returned in a timely manner.

Setting You Up for Success

Setting You Up for Success- Helping you prepare all your documents for pre-approval and the loan application, Mission One Mortgage will provide you with all the necessary information to secure the best loan.

Contact Us For Service !

Free Consultation phone-number (843) 822-5685

To understand the benefits of working with a mortgage broker, you must first understand their role in the home-buying process.

What Does a Mortgage Broker Do?

Your mortgage broker is a third party that works to connect you with mortgage lenders. Essentially, a mortgage broker works as an intermediary between a person who wants to buy a home and the entities offering loans to buy a home. The mortgage broker works with both the borrower and lender to get the borrower approved. They also verify and collect paperwork from the borrower that the lender needs to finish a home purchase. Typically, mortgage brokers have relationships with several home loan lenders. Mission One Mortgage, for example, has access to 50 different lenders, which gives us a wide range of home loans in Johns Island, SC, from which to choose.

In addition to finding a home loan lender, your mortgage broker will help you settle on the best loan options and interest rates for your budget. Ideally, your mortgage broker will take a great deal of stress and legwork off your plate while also potentially saving you money.

Help with the Pre-Approval Process

If you're ready to buy a home, getting pre-qualified is a great choice that will streamline the entire process. Your mortgage broker makes getting pre-approved easy by obtaining all the documents needed to get you pre-qualified. In taking a look at your application, they will determine if you're ready for the pre-approval process. If your application needs additional items, the mortgage company will help point you in the right direction to ensure your application is as strong as it can be. Your mortgage broker will also walk you through the different types of loans, from Conventional and FHA to VA and USDA.

In order to be pre-approved for a home in South Carolina, you must have the following:

  • Two Years of W2 Forms
  • 30 Days of Pay Stubs from Employer
  • 60 Days of Bank Statements
  • A Valid Driver's License

Conventional Mortgages

Conventional loans can be used to purchase a new home or refinance your current one. Conventional loans include fixed-rate mortgages and adjustable-rate mortgages. Generally, borrowers must put down a 3% down payment for owner-occupants, 10% for a vacation property, and 20% for an investment home. If you are able to pay 20% of the total cost of the home, you can avoid private mortgage insurance, which is otherwise required. Conventional mortgages are often preferred by buyers with good credit or people needing a non-owner-occupied mortgage.

 Mortgage Broker Johns Island, SC
 Mortgage Company Johns Island, SC

FHA Loans

FHA mortgages are issued by the U.S. government and backed by the Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD). This loan is often preferred by first-time homebuyers because it only requires a 3.5% down payment and offers more flexibility with credit requirements and underwriting standards. FHA loans have several requirements you must meet to qualify. Contact Mission One Mortgage today to learn more about FHA loans and whether or not they're best for your financial situation.

USDA Loans

Also backed by the government, these loans are insured by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and don't require money down. These loans have lower insurance requirements when compared to FHA loans, offer 100% financing if you qualify, and allow for closing costs to be covered by the seller. In order to qualify for a USDA loan, you must live in a rural area, and your household income must meet certain standards. These loans are often preferred by low-income citizens who live in rural parts of South Carolina.

 Mortgage Lending Service Johns Island, SC
 Refinancing Johns Island, SC

Veteran Mortgages

Also known as VA or Veteran's Affairs loans, these mortgages are reserved for the brave men and women who served in the military. VA loans help provide our military members, veterans, and their families with favorable loan terms and an easy home ownership experience. Often, those who qualify are not required to make a down payment on their home. Additionally, these loans often include less expensive closing costs.

If you are a veteran or the family member of a veteran, contact Mission One Mortgage today to speak with our Vetted VA Professional, Debbie Haberny. Debbie helps our military members, veterans, and their family members obtain home loans utilizing veteran benefits and would be happy to help as you search for a home.

Q. I was talking to my spouse about mortgage brokers, and they mentioned the phrase home loan originator. What's the difference between a broker and a loan originator?

A. The mortgage industry is full of confusing jobs and titles, making it easy to confuse roles and responsibilities. Such is the case with mortgage brokers and home loan originators. Though their roles share similarities, a home loan originator in Johns Island, SC, works for a bank or credit union, while a mortgage broker works for a brokerage company. Home loan originators and mortgage brokers are both licensed by the Nationwide Multistate Licensing System (NMLS).

Q. I've heard from everyone that you must have mortgage insurance to buy a home. What is mortgage insurance?

A. Essentially, mortgage insurance helps protect lenders if a borrower forecloses on the home they bought. One advantage of mortgage insurance is that when borrowers pay it, lenders can often grant loans to buyers when they might not have otherwise. Though not always required to buy a home, mortgage insurance is often needed for down payments of less than 20%.

Q. I have just been pre-approved to buy a beautiful home in South Carolina. Is there anything I shouldn't do now that I'm pre-qualified?

A. Mortgage companies like Mission One Mortgage, make getting pre-qualified for a home easy. However, as your loan process continues, your lender is required to run a new credit report before closing on a home. For that reason, it's to avoid any activity that might affect your credit score, such as:

  • Do not become a co-signer on a loan with someone else.
  • Do not quit or change your job.
  • Do not apply for new credit cards, automobile loans, or any other lines of credit.
  • Do not use your credit card to pay for large purchases, like furniture for your new house.
  • Do not avoid payments on current lines of credit, loans, or utility bills.

Q. My brother-in-law recently refinanced his home in South Carolina. What is refinancing, and should I consider refinancing my home too?

A. Refinancing your home basically means you're swapping your current mortgage for a new one, most often with a lower interest rate. If you would like to reduce the term of your loan, lower your monthly mortgage payments, or consolidate debt, refinancing may be a smart option. Many homeowners also choose to refinance if they want to switch from adjustable-rate mortgages to fixed-rate mortgages or to get cash back for home renovations. To learn whether refinancing is a viable option for your situation, contact Mission One Mortgage ASAP, as loan rates change frequently.

Mission One Mortgage: Turning Dreams into Reality, One Mortgage at a Time

Head-bottom

Here at Mission One Mortgage, we believe that the best communities begin with the dream of home ownership. Our mission is to make those dreams come true, with personalized service, expert guidance, and good old-fashioned hard work. As one of the most trusted mortgage companies in Johns Island, SC, we have years of experience working with a diverse range of clients, from first-time buyers and investors to self-employed borrowers and non-native English speakers.

Though every mortgage situation is different, one thing never changes: our commitment to clients. Contact our office today to get started on an exceptional home-buying experience.

Contact Us For Service !

phone-number (843) 822-5685
 Refinances Johns Island, SC

Latest News in Johns Island, SC

$277M hospital proposed for Johns Island

Trident Medical Center has submitted a Certificate of Need to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control to build a $277 million hospital on Johns Island. The application is for a 50-bed acute care hospital between Maybank Highway and Cane Slash Road, across from the Live Oak Square development.Projections for Johns Island Hospital show that within the first three years it will create nearly 300 jobs, contribute $10 million in non-income taxes to support the community and pay $70 million in salaries, wages and b...

Trident Medical Center has submitted a Certificate of Need to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control to build a $277 million hospital on Johns Island. The application is for a 50-bed acute care hospital between Maybank Highway and Cane Slash Road, across from the Live Oak Square development.

Projections for Johns Island Hospital show that within the first three years it will create nearly 300 jobs, contribute $10 million in non-income taxes to support the community and pay $70 million in salaries, wages and benefits, the organization said in a release.

“We are excited to continue making medical care more accessible to residents in our historically underserved communities,” Trident Health President and CEO Christina Oh said in the news release. “Currently on Johns Island and neighboring communities, it can take residents 30 to 45 minutes to drive to their nearest hospital, and often longer in heavy traffic and inclement weather. Our goal is to increase access to timely, high quality and affordable health care services.”

Trident Medical Center’s chief of the medical staff and medical director of emergency services, Dr. Scott Hayes, said he sees firsthand the results of delayed care.

“For residents who live far from emergency medical care and who may be experiencing a medical emergency like a heart attack or a stroke, minutes can mean the difference between life and death,” he said in the news release. “Access to care close to home is critical, especially in areas like Johns Island and the surrounding communities, that have frequent traffic delays.”

Trident Health surgeon Dr. Thomas Litton, who lived on Johns Island for 20 years and recently moved from there largely due to increasing traffic congestion and limited access routes off the island, said, “The rapid population growth and development of Johns Island, as well as its role as the sole gateway to Kiawah, Seabrook and Wadmalaw Islands, has created a strong need for a full-service hospital in the area. Residents on those islands have never had a full-service hospital. Trident’s hospital on Johns Island and their freestanding ER on James Island will greatly improve residents’ access to much-needed medical care.”

Johns Island Hospital will be located seven miles from James Island Emergency, Trident’s new freestanding ER at 945 Folly Road, Charleston, that will open in the next few weeks.

Plans call for Johns Island Hospital to have 50 beds with space to expand to 150 beds, 40 medical/surgical/stepdown beds, 10 ICU beds, 20 ER rooms, four operating rooms, two endoscopy suites and a cardiac catheterization lab. The hospital also would have two CT scanners, an MRI, two diagnostic radiology suites and a fluoroscopy room.

In addition to the hospital, services would include medical offices for primary care and specialists as well as outpatient imaging and support such as breast imaging, rehabilitation and other outpatient therapy services.

“From our first discussions about building a hospital on Johns Island, we have been committed to creating a thoughtful plan that preserves the natural beauty of Johns Island,” Oh said in the release. “We will honor the strong Gullah Geechee cultures of the community; we will partner with the areas’ community and businesses; and will promote the important and unique contributions of Johns Island’s agricultural community.”

The proposed Johns Island Hospital is in addition to nearly $140M in capital investments currently underway at Trident Health’s hospitals, Trident Medical Center and Summerville

Trident Health announces plans to develop new hospital on Johns Island

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — A new 50-bed acute care hospital may soon be on its way to Johns Island.Trident Medical Center announced Thursday morning that the health system had submitted a Certificate of Need to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) to construct the care facility, which would be located between Maybank Highway and Cane Slash Road.“We are excited to continue making medical care more accessible to residents in our historically underserved communities,” sai...

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — A new 50-bed acute care hospital may soon be on its way to Johns Island.

Trident Medical Center announced Thursday morning that the health system had submitted a Certificate of Need to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) to construct the care facility, which would be located between Maybank Highway and Cane Slash Road.

“We are excited to continue making medical care more accessible to residents in our historically underserved communities,” said Trident Health President and CEO Christina Oh. “Currently on Johns Island and neighboring communities, it can take residents 30 to 45 minutes to drive to their nearest hospital, and often longer in heavy traffic and inclement weather. Our goal is to increase access to timely, high quality and affordable health care services.”

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The $277 million project would not only bring much-needed care to the residents of Johns Island. According to Trident Medical Center, in its first three years, the hospital would help create nearly 300 jobs, pay out $70 million in wages and benefits and contribute another $10 million in non-income taxes to support the surrounding area.

Johns Island Hospital would be located approximately seven miles from James Island Emergency Room, which is set to open in the next few weeks, according to Trident Medical Center.

“The rapid population growth and development of Johns Island, as well as its role as the sole gateway to Kiawah, Seabrook, and Wadmalaw Islands, has created a strong need for a full service hospital in the area," said Trident Health surgeon Dr. Thomas Litton, who lived on the island for two decades. "Residents on those islands have never had a full service hospital. Trident’s hospital on Johns Island and their freestanding ER on James Island will greatly improve residents’ access to much-needed medical care.”

While Johns Island Hospital will initially feature 50 beds, including 10 ICU beds, hospital staff say the medical center will have enough room for 100 more beds.

Other features would include 20 emergency rooms, four operating rooms, two endoscopy suites, one catheterization (cath) lab, two CT scanners, one MRI scanner and two diagnostic radiology suites.

“From our first discussions about building a hospital on Johns Island, we have been committed to creating a thoughtful plan that preserves the natural beauty of Johns Island,” Oh said. "We will honor the strong Gullah Geechee cultures of the community; we will partner with the areas’ community and businesses; and will promote the important and unique contributions of Johns Island’s agricultural community."

Hicks: County and city put Johns Island traffic solution in gear

There’s a new red light on Maybank Highway, and new Charleston County Councilman Joe Boykin hears about it. Every. Single. Day.Because, make no mistake, traffic is the undisputed heavyweight chokepoint of contention on Johns Island.“A lot of folks are upset; they can’t get on and off the island,” Boykin says. “You think it’s bad now — there are 1,300 homes planned or under construction around there. Wait ’til all that drops.”Yep, that’s the thing — the isl...

There’s a new red light on Maybank Highway, and new Charleston County Councilman Joe Boykin hears about it. Every. Single. Day.

Because, make no mistake, traffic is the undisputed heavyweight chokepoint of contention on Johns Island.

“A lot of folks are upset; they can’t get on and off the island,” Boykin says. “You think it’s bad now — there are 1,300 homes planned or under construction around there. Wait ’til all that drops.”

Yep, that’s the thing — the island can’t wait any longer for traffic relief. Residents have been waiting, largely in idling cars, for years now.

Johns Island’s chronic congestion — and dysfunction — has spread over time, and overwhelms James Island and West Ashley with tens of thousands of commuters daily. Sometimes the drive-by traffic shuts down the grid west of the Ashley River.

See: Savannah Highway and Main Road, Interstate 526 and Sam Rittenberg, Maybank and Folly Road, et al.

There are various solutions to this problem planned, but land disputes, jurisdictional spats, environmental concerns, the threat of lawsuits and rising construction costs have slowed many of those projects. It’s a mess.

Of course, politics is behind some of the paralysis. Nobody can agree on anything these days, especially what needs to be done about Johns Island growth … and its infrastructure.

It’s really about an island with an exploding population that has exactly two routes on and off it. You could call that poor planning, but plans for a third route have been in the works for years. But that’s another story.

So here we are.

There is some reason for hope, however. On Thursday, county and city traffic engineers — along with Boykin, County Council Vice Chairwoman Jenny Honeycutt and City Councilman Karl Brady — sat down in Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg’s office to talk about more collaboration between the two local governments to get various road projects moving.

Which is a good sign, because in the past the two haven’t always seen eye to eye.

At Boykin’s request, County Council recently pledged to work more closely with the city on Johns Island traffic.

And a unanimous vote from a City Council committee last week affirmed its commitment to the same.

Most significantly, City Council gave initial consent to a fourth lane to Maybank Highway between River Road and the bridge to James Island. Right now, much of that stretch is restricted to a single outbound lane that at times is ridiculously overwhelmed.

The City Council resolution is notable because, years ago, Charleston held up county plans to widen Maybank — largely because officials didn’t want to sacrifice trees for additional lanes.

But in the past two years, the traffic count on Maybank has gone up by 6,000 cars per day, to a new high of more than 35,000. For comparison, about 45,000 cross the Wappoo bridge.

The agreement to widen Maybank Highway is a good start, because it’ll ease the bottleneck that builds up ahead of the bridge to James Island. Boykin says if that can be done without sacrificing any trees, it will be.

That’s a big deal but, frankly, just having the city and county in accord is bigger.

“I believe we have a newfound, unprecedented level of cooperation and commitment to improving the traffic at River and Maybank,” Tecklenburg says. “We’re looking at temporary and long-term ways to get two lanes from River Road to the bridge. We’re going to update the traffic plan, which should take about a month. We’re going to do whatever the Department of Transportation will allow.”

Because, remember, the state technically owns all these roads.

Commute times don’t yet reflect it, but there’s already some movement.

The county’s northern pitchfork is under construction — that new traffic signal at Maybank and Fenwick Hall Allee (the one Boykin is getting calls about) is in place because that’s where the pitchfork will meet the highway.

The problem has been the light’s timing. As any traffic engineer will tell you, when a road is that hopelessly over capacity, it’s difficult to sync it.

The next challenge will be building the southern pitchfork, which Boykin says is key to alleviating congestion on that side of the island. And it’s needed whether or not 526 gets finished.

That’s one thing the county and city, which secured land for the southern leg a few years back, will study in the coming months.

As Boykin and Tecklenburg note, the tines of the pitchfork need to align because yet another traffic light on that stretch of Maybank is simply not an option.

Neither is allowing Johns Island’s congestion to fester any longer.

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Residents fed up with 'deplorable' living conditions at Johns Island apartment complex

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — It started as an island paradise, but residents at a Johns Island apartment complex say their home now resembles the woods.The residents of Sea Island Apartments, which houses about 48 people off Maybank Highway, are speaking out against what they describe as "deplorable" conditions.Read more: ...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — It started as an island paradise, but residents at a Johns Island apartment complex say their home now resembles the woods.

The residents of Sea Island Apartments, which houses about 48 people off Maybank Highway, are speaking out against what they describe as "deplorable" conditions.

Read more: One80 Place launches eviction prevention line to support Charleston renters

"We have seen grass grow almost knee and chest high," said Farley, a disabled military veteran who has been living in the complex for six years. "You see fallen trees in the area, people not receiving maintenance, and overloaded trash bin."

In addition to the overgrown vegetation, the residents are concerned about random visits from wildlife. They say it seems management has slacked off and there's been little to no communication.

"You're forced to pay rent on time, but still, your issues are going unaddressed," Farley said. "We'll reach out to management and they haven't meet with us. Every time, they change management or owners. Nobody has contact to it."

It started as an island paradise, but residents at a Johns Island apartment complex say their home now resembles the woods. (WCIV)

There is also only one trashcan in the entire community and a small number of parking spaces.

"You have disabled people having to walk all the way down to one trash bin," Farley said. "There are not enough handicap parking spots. (Management) told us we'd have to park on the side of the road if there are no parking spaces."

"It's time we be up to date, as we were before," said Charlotte Turner, who has been living in the complex for 10 years. "Management needs to show a serious concern about resident complaints, at least be willing to meet or communicate."

Read more: Mayor Tecklenburg to host ribbon cutting for six new affordable housing properties in Charleston

A councilman was reached for comment on this area, but he was unable to conduct an interview due to prior commitments. A representative from the Charleston Development Group was also reached for comment.

Johns Island residents push back on proposed bridge over marsh

The marshy edges of the Charleston peninsula and its surrounding islands were long viewed as opportune sites to dump debris and add developable land mass to a city surrounded by water.But that attitude has shifted in recent decades as concerns over sea-level rise and loss of native plants and animals take focus. That’s why a proposal to build a bridge over a largely untouched marsh on Johns Island caught nearby residents off guard.“It was astounding to me,” said John Zlogar, chairman of the Johns Island Task F...

The marshy edges of the Charleston peninsula and its surrounding islands were long viewed as opportune sites to dump debris and add developable land mass to a city surrounded by water.

But that attitude has shifted in recent decades as concerns over sea-level rise and loss of native plants and animals take focus. That’s why a proposal to build a bridge over a largely untouched marsh on Johns Island caught nearby residents off guard.

“It was astounding to me,” said John Zlogar, chairman of the Johns Island Task Force. The group was established a decade ago to bring together residents and local officials to address Johns Island-specific issues.

The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control will review an application from property owner Michael Blanchard to build a bridge connecting his piece of land on a narrow island in Pennys Creek, a tributary of the Stono River, to the mainland of Johns Island. The property is zoned to allow up to 40 single-family homes, but Blanchard has not submitted any formal plans to the city yet. The lot has been in his family since the 1940s but until now, no one has had the financial means to both develop it and build a bridge to it, he said.

“We’d like to put some houses on it,” he said. “Heck, I would live out there if I could.”

Building a bridge would connect his 60-acre property to an existing neighborhood made up of two roads and about 200 townhomes off of River Road. An extension of one of those roads, Fenwick Planation Road, would be required for drivers to access the bridge. And Blanchard already has an easement there because his family previously owned the land across Pennys Creek as well.

But using that easement would result in what resident Candice Losego calls, “an eyesore.”

“It would go right against my backyard,” she said.

A view that currently gives way to marsh grass, seabirds and the occasional herd of deer, would be obstructed by a 33-foot-wide bridge the length of 1½ football fields.

Losego and other residents of the neighborhood have been rallying supporters to call for DHEC to host a public hearing on the proposal.

Because DHEC has received over 20 requests for a hearing, officials said they will host one on Johns Island but have not set a date and time yet. At the hearing, residents will have an opportunity to share comments about the proposal before DHEC reviews the application.

Potential alternatives

As of now, Blanchard’s lot is inaccessible.

The nearest road to Blanchard’s property on the island, Rushland Landing Road, runs perpendicular to it and leads to a bridge connecting to Johns Island. Between Blanchard’s land and Rushland Landing Road is a piece of property owned by S.C. Department of Transportation that stretches the width of the island, isolating Blanchard’s lot.

Residents and environmental advocates would prefer Blanchard get an easement from the S.C. Department of Transportation to access Rushland Landing Road instead of building another bridge.

“The applicant does not appear to have detailed why this is an infeasible route for access,” a comment submitted to DHEC by the Coastal Conservation League states.

DOT bought the property adjacent to Blanchard’s in 2019 in anticipation of the department’s plan to extend Interstate 526 and link West Ashley, Johns Island and James Island. As a part of the larger project, the department plans to build a connector through its property on the small island in Pennys Creek.

Charleston Chief Resiliency Officer Dale Morris said that if the project gets the go-ahead, it would make more sense for Blanchard to try to tie into the proposed connector that would run though the island and use it as the main access point to his property rather than attempt to build his own bridge.

“The Dutch Dialogues would say, ‘have as little of a touch on the marsh there as you can,’” Morris said, referring to a yearlong flood-management research program the city underwent in 2019. “Using the I-526 opportunity to access that land would be better than building that bridge.”

But the full project has stalled somewhat due to eye-popping cost estimates that most recently landed at $2.2 billion. While the agency works to fill funding gaps, any property DOT bought in preparation for the effort sits in limbo.

Blanchard said if he had his way, he wouldn’t have to build a bridge at all.

“If we can get access to Rushland Landing Road, we would give up on the bridge in a heartbeat,” he said.

A statement from DOT said granting access to the property is “not possible,” due to the myriad government agencies involved in the I-526 project. The agency is also not obligated to grant access to Blanchard because it had been landlocked long before DOT bought the property, the statement read.

Whether the bridge plans materialize or not, Blanchard will likely face fresh opposition should he choose to develop his property.

A shifting tide

New developments in sensitive areas such as Pennys Creek are in murky territory when it comes to city regulations.

What is currently legal may not be legal a few years from now.

That’s because Charleston officials are currently crafting a Comprehensive Water Plan and a new zoning code for the entire city. When those documents are complete, developers will have a new set of standards to follow. And those could restrict how much building happens in low-lying areas, especially along a marsh.

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“We have to turn those concepts and goals into a zoning ordinance and language,” Morris said. “Once we do that we will have more control over how and where development can occur.”

But without new zoning laws in place, the city is facing an uphill battle managing the drainage needs of both old and new neighborhoods.

Upstream from Pennys Creek, Charleston is pursuing a $12 million drainage project around the Barberry Woods Development. The city plans to restore 25-acres of wetlands around the flood-prone neighborhood for use as a public park and natural drainage tool. The open space will help absorb stormwater that eventually runs into Pennys Creek and then the Stono River. The last thing the city needs, Morris said, is another bridge disrupting that process.

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